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Democrats Are Going To Keep Losing If They Don’t Change Say Midwest Democrats

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(Via The Daily Caller)

A group of Democratic politicians from Midwestern states is calling on the party to change or face a minority for years to come.


“The number of Democrats holding office across the nation is at its lowest point since the 1920s and the decline has been especially severe in rural America,” Illinois Rep. Cheri Bustos, a Democrat, wrote in a new report.


After years of dominance in state and local offices, eight midwestern states turned solidly red around the time of President Donald Trump’s defeat of Democrat Hillary Clinton, and Democrats have lost their authority.


“Hope from the Heartland: How Democrats Can Better Serve the Midwest by Bringing Rural, Working Class Wisdom to Washington,” a report compiled by Cher PAC, an organization for Bustos, offers suggestions for how Democrats could accomplish such a feat.


Busto’s report includes interviews with 72 Democratic politicians from “the Heartland” — Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin — who have won local and statewide elections despite the GOP sweep of the rural Midwest.


At the national level, midwestern Democrats appear to be doing fine: 10 of the 16 U.S. senators from heartland states are Democratic, but the report warns that after 2016, “the rural vote in states like Missouri, Ohio, Wisconsin and Indiana will be critical in determining whether Democrats hold those seats.”


To regain influence in the Midwest in 2018 and beyond, Democrats must change their messaging, focus on jobs and the economy, reach out to Midwestern voters more and adapt campaigns to rural America, Bustos, who is up for reelection in 2018, says in the report.


One of the big problems is that Democrats seem to be most interested in national identity politics driven by urban centers than reflecting values of voters in rural areas.


“We say we’re diverse and tolerant, but we’re really not tolerant of certain groups,” said former Democratic Indiana state Rep. Dennie Oxley, according to the report.


“The Democratic brand is hugely damaged, and it’s going to take a while to bring it back,” Illinois state Rep. Jerry Costello Jr., also a Democrat, said. “Democrats in southern Illinois have been more identified by bathrooms than by putting people back to work.”


The big policy areas Democrats should focus on to attract rural voters to, or back to, the Democrats are infrastructure, education, small
business, economic and national, agriculture, and reducing government waste, according to the report.


“If we don’t get this right in the next two cycles, we’re done,” Robin Johnson, a consultant and adviser to Bustos told Politico, adding that the report is “a cold reality check.”

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Austin Texas May Change It’s Name According To A New City Report About Confederate Statues

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(Via myStatesman)

Known as both the “father of Texas” and the namesake of the state’s capital, Stephen F. Austin carved out the early outlines of Texas among his many accomplishments.
He also opposed an attempt by Mexico to ban slavery in the province of Tejas and said if slaves were freed, they would turn into “vagabonds, a nuisance and a menace.”

For that reason, the city of Austin’s Equity Office suggested renaming the city in a report about existing Confederate monuments that was published this week.

Also on the list of locales to possibly be renamed: Pease Park, the Bouldin Creek neighborhood, Barton Springs and 10 streets named for William Barton, the “Daniel Boone of Texas,” who was a slave owner.

(Read Full Story)

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Birth Rate On The Rise In The United States?

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(Via New York Post)

Sometimes a society’s values change sharply with almost no one noticing. In 1968, according to a Gallup survey, 70 percent of American adults said that a family of three or more children was “ideal” — about the same number as Gallup surveys starting in 1938. That number helps explain the explosive baby boom after Americans were no longer constrained by depression and world war.

Those values and numbers didn’t last. By 1978, Gallup reported that only 39 percent considered three or more children “ideal.” The numbers have hovered around there ever since, spiking to just 41 percent in the late-1990s tech boom.

The change in values and behavior took time to register. Just before the 1972 presidential election, then-President Richard Nixon and a Democratic Congress goosed up Social Security benefits. They figured the baby-boom generation was just delaying producing a baby boom of its own. Wrong. Social Security has needed patching up ever since.

Similarly, the 1970s showed sharp increases in female workforce participation, divorce and single-parent households, as well as decreased participation in voluntary organizations — all unanticipated.

Is a similar values shift happening now? Maybe so, suggest George Mason University associate professor Philip Auerswald and Palo Alto hedge-fund manager Joon Yun in an article in The New York Times. They point out that the American fertility rate — the number of children per woman age 15 to 44 — has hit a post-1970s low.

Birth rates typically drop during recessions and rise a bit during booms. They did drop notably from 2007 to 2009. But the latest data don’t show a rebound, despite significant growth and record-low unemployment.

(Full Story Here)

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IT’S OFFICIAL: LGBTQ Adds The P For Pedophilia

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